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Home » Acer Aspire Vero review: an “eco-friendly” laptop that ticks many boxes BD

Acer Aspire Vero review: an “eco-friendly” laptop that ticks many boxes BD

The 15-inch laptop from Acer has many ecological advantages, but are the manufacturer’s arguments sufficient to make the purchase?

With its Aspire Vero, Acer is trying an interesting bet: offering an ecological laptop. We will see what the arguments of the constructor are.

  • Processor : 2.9GHz Intel Core i7-1195G7
  • RAM : 16 GB
  • Storage: 1TB M.2 SSD (512GB on the pre-series model we received)
  • Graphics: Integrated Intel Iris Xe
  • Screen: 15.6 inch IPS Full HD
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth 5.0
  • Dimensions : 36.3 x 24.9 x 2.2cm
  • Weight : 1.83kg
  • Price: 1149 euros
     

The machine also has four USB connectors (one USB 2.0, two USB 3.2 Gen1 Type-A and one USB 3.2 Gen1 Type-C), as well as an HDMI output and an RJ45 network input. But Acer ignores the SD or microSD card reader, which is a shame and second hand laptop price in bd.

The first ecological aspect concerns the design of the device. Acer uses 30% PCR (Post-Consumer Recycled) recycled plastic in the paintless chassis of its computer, which pleasantly surprises with its gray appearance with colored glitter.

The keyboard keys also benefit from recycled plastic, up to 50%. In addition, the R and E keys have a special serigraphy in yellow to underline the message of Acer: Reduce, Reuse & Recycle (reduce, reuse and recycle).

The other advantage of the Acer PC concerns its disassembly which is very easy thanks to the use of standardised Phillips screws. This provides quick access to the main internal elements of the device.

You will therefore have no problem changing the computer’s RAM, or its SSD to M.2 format.In addition, the PC boasts an excellent repairability index of 8.2 out of 10. Last element put in place by Acer to reinforce the ecological aspect of its Aspire Vero: the VeroSense software. Clear and didactic, this program allows you to choose modes of consumption adapted to your needs.This type of program exists from other manufacturers, but Acer goes a little further by offering two modes for recharging the battery. The first charges to 100%, while the second only charges to 80% to optimise the process and, according to the manufacturer, to increase the life of the battery.

So, would the Aspire Vero be the ideal ecological laptop? Unfortunately not, because its 15.6-inch IPS screen suffers from a very average contrast ratio (1,409:1) and above all from a lack of brightness (256 cd / m²) which weighs down its overall rating, and the comfort of ‘use.

The viewing angles are satisfactory, as well as the colorimetry, but the screen is covered with a coating which gives a glassy appearance when you look at it closely.

As for the keyboard, typing is comfortable. The touchpad is responsive, and even incorporates a fingerprint reader. On the other hand, the numeric keypad is really small, which is a shame for a 15-inch model.

Finally, if you are a music lover, don’t expect miracles with the two loudspeakers which diffuse towards the bottom of the device: the sound is flat and without relief.

Power under the hood-

With a Core i7-1195G7 processor (eleventh generation, therefore),. The Aspire Vero turns out to be rather swift and obtains an excellent score of 5,237 points in the PC Mark 10 test, as well as a satisfactory score of 5,986 points in the test Cinebench R23 (multicore).

With its Aspire Vero, sold for 1,149 euros, Acer is making commendable efforts to offer an ecological laptop. We particularly appreciated the ease of dismantling and the easy access to the components. In addition, the VeroSense software is an asset to save energy and increase battery longevity. The PC benefits from a good configuration, which gives it enough power for most applications. The autonomy is acceptable, although a little disappointing, but it is above all the screen which is the weak point of the machine, with a lack of brightness which will greatly limit the display comfort when used outdoors…

MOST

  • +  Original and ecological design
  • +  Easy to disassemble
  • +  Good level of equipment

THE LESSERS

  • –  Poor screen quality
  • –  Small numeric keypad
  • –  The autonomy that could have been better

Ergonomics and control-

On this side, we are simply won over as Wacom seems to have thought of everything! We first find on the side 8 ExpressKeys, which can be associated with memory shortcuts to functions or commands. We note the central presence on this edge of a single button, which is in a way the central button of the machine, allowing easy navigation between the different applications or adjusting the technical characteristics of creation. Above all, the screen is Multi-Touch, thus working in the same way as a touch screen: you can select, (un)zoom, cancel, and move… all using your fingers! Note that this is a feature that you can deactivate directly from the edge of the device, using a dedicated button. Useful when switching to creation mode, especially since finger drawing is not (yet?) available.

Creative features and the Wacom pen

Now let’s get to the heart of the matter: creation! Because that’s what it’s all about, and rest assured: you benefit from quality equipment, under the name of Wacom Pro Pen 2 for the stylus. Its handling is easy and intuitive, reproducing the sensations of drawing on real paper. Its sensitivity explodes with 8192 pressure points , offering the most precise and realistic rendering. Attractive point: The pen detects tilt , so your stroke doesn’t take the same shape. You can thus give free rein to your creativity: the screen will take care of bringing it to life for you!

The Acer Vero has a contemporary aesthetic that never goes out of style. It’s like the magic of the backwaters of Alleppey and the old-world charm of the houseboat. You know Acer is using post-consumer recycled plastic, but the overall aesthetics is calm and relaxing. The notebook’s chassis is covered in speckled grey coloured plastic reminiscent of paper mesh greeting cards, with a flecked yellow pattern. Acer says the laptop’s body is made from 30 per cent PCR materials, while the keycaps are made up of 50 per cent PCR. Even the panel is 99 per cent recyclable, and the laptop comes in a cardboard box that’s 100 per cent recyclable. Instead of throwing away the box, the company encourages you to use it as a mini-laptop stand. The chassis is totally paint-free, a step towards its sustainability promises for the future.

The laptop feels solid and unique, although it’s not as sleek as the MacBook Air. At 1.8 kg, it’s lightweight, which could make it a good pick for university students or someone who is looking for a notebook for casual use. Although I liked the build quality of the notebook, I did notice a little flex on its deck. Also, it would have been great to see shrunken-down bezels around the screen. But I am glad that Acer is making it easy for users, especially on a mid-range notebook, to get inside the device and replace or upgrade components.

The notebook has two USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports, a USB 2.0, an HDMI and a headphone jack. Other connectivity options include dual-band Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5.0 and Gigabit Ethernet, and there’s a fingerprint reader and a webcam. It, however, lacks a built-in SD card reader and Thunderbolt connectivity.

Note– The viewing angles are satisfactory, as well as the colorimetry, but the screen is covered with a coating which gives a glassy appearance when you look at it closely.

As for the keyboard, typing is comfortable. The touchpad is responsive, and even incorporates a fingerprint reader. On the other hand, the numeric keypad is really small, which is a shame for a 15-inch model.